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The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Given a theoretically perfect set of mirrors reflecting into each other and a perfect set of eyes, can you see infinity? Francois Pittion Continue reading… Source link
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Picture someone with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). You’re probably imagining a person who is easily distracted, can barely sit still, and impulsively jumps from topic to topic at a hundred miles an hour.   For some people this is endearing, but for others, someone with ADHD sounds like their worst nightmare. But our preconceptions
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On Roger Elliott’s 60th birthday, a conference in his honour displayed beneath his photograph the title: “Disorder in Condensed Matter Physics”. This reference to his speciality in theoretical physics, where he made important contributions to theories of optical, magnetic and semiconductor properties of the solid state, was ironic, for Elliott, who has died aged 89,
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The following is adapted from a press release issued today by MIT and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. NASA’s next planet hunter, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), is one step closer to searching for new worlds after successfully completing a lunar flyby on May 17. The spacecraft passed about 5,000 miles from the moon,
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Eight MIT students and recent alumni have been named winners of Fulbright U.S. Student Program research awards. An additional student received an award but declined the grant to pursue other opportunities. Destinations for this year’s Fulbright recipients include Germany, Switzerland, and other countries of the European Union; Chile; and Indonesia. Students’ research interests range from
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The Kīlauea volcano in Hawaii began causing earthquakes on Wednesday afternoon, after morning explosions of “ballistic blocks” three times larger than bowling balls. Earthquakes up to 4.4 magnitude have been measured after Kilauea’s caldera, one of its large craters, dropped 90cm causing nearby faults to move.   According to the US Geological Survey (USGS), residents
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If you thought the crisis over the gaping hole in the ozone layer was under control, prepare to be disappointed. Researchers at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have noticed an unexpected and persistent increase in ozone-destroying chemicals, called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).   The Montreal Protocol, which was finalised in 1987, was a revolutionary, international